‘Naked Bacon' free of cancer-causing nitrites hits UK shelves – but it's TWICE the price

‘Naked Bacon' free of cancer-causing nitrites hits UK shelves – but it's TWICE the price

Bacon, a meat made from cured pork, is a core part of the traditional Full English breakfast.



But last October the World Health Organisation said bacon, sausages and ham were among most carcinogenic substances and ranked them along with cigarettes, alcohol, asbestos and arsenic.

Now, a new version called Naked Bacon has been produced and it is said to be good for you. 

The bacon, created by Northern Irish company Finnebrogue, is free of nitrites – which are said to cause cancer, according to health experts. But would you eat it?

Naked bacon will be available in supermarkets in just two weeks’ time, 10 January 2018. 

However, this all-new nitrite-free meat will cost twice as much as the usual supermarket brand; the rashers will cost 50p each, marketed in packets of six. 

This compares with Sainsbury’s bacon, where you can buy 8 rashers for £2 – making it 25p a rasher.

Bacon sales in the UK went down 11 per cent last year – with Britons buying 25.4 million fewer packs of the favourite hangover cure. 

The rashers have received a mixed reception among bacon fans on Twitter.

One wrote: “Whose idea was it to do away with full fat bacon? If I’m gonna die I’m gonna die eating full fat bacon, there’s no other way!”

Another wrote: “Naked bacon….Twice the price hmm.”

However, one user praised the bacon’s Northern Irish origins.

They wrote: “Made in N.I…get your hands on the future. Naked Bacon, it’s a porker.”

The new bacon type has been produced after the World Health Organisation (WHO) said bacon cured with nitrites is as dangerous as asbestos and smoking. 

This is because nitrites are said to produce a carcinogenic called “nitrosamines” in your body.

Denis Lynn Finnebrogue chairman, said: “Our Naked Bacon is not only safer than any other bacon on the market, it also tops the charts in blind taste tests.

“This really is the biggest revolution to the British breakfast for a generation.”

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