Flu hotspots MAPPED: Areas worst hit by virus as deadly Aussie strain arrives in UK

Flu hotspots MAPPED: Areas worst hit by virus as deadly Aussie strain arrives in UK

Aussie flu is on the rise as new figures from Public Health England revealed. 



Its National Influenza Report detailed 17 people were left fighting for life in the last week. 

And the number of people admitted to Intensive care units (ICU) with the deadly illness has almost doubled in the last seven days. 

The infectious illness is the H3N2 strain of the flu virus, and was given the name ‘Australian flu’ – for short ‘Aussie flu’ – after it affected up to 170,000 people in Australia during its winter. 

This was more than two-and-a-half times last year’s total and over 300 people who caught the disease were reported to have died. 

Last week Ireland saw its first deaths, and now the potentially killer strain has been confirmed in parts of England too. 

A map showing flu hotspots across the UK has been released. 

The interactive map showing Britain reveals the areas worst hit by the illness has been issued by online influenza surveillance system Flusurvey

The heat map shows a gradient from no reported influenza like illness (blue) to very high reports of influenza like illness (red). 

It’s currently being updated every three minutes online. 

According to the map as of Friday morning, a number of locations across the UK are in the red. 

These include: 

  • Outer Hebrides, Scotland 
  • Dundee, Scotland 
  • Dumfries, Scotland
  • Middlesborough, England 
  • Hull, England 
  • South Yorkshire, England 
  • Bolton, England 
  • Plymouth, England 

Northern Ireland, Salisbury, Portsmouth, Chelmsford and Canterbury have also seen high reports of flu. 

So what are the symptoms of Aussie flu? 

The symptoms are similar to those caused by normal flu, but are more severe. 

The NHS outlines nine flu symptoms

  • A sudden fever – a temperature of 38C or above 
  • Aching body 
  • Feeling tired or exhausted 
  • Dry, chesty cough
  • Sore throat
  • Headache 
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhoea or tummy pain
  • Nausea and being sick 

Those most at risk of catching Aussie flu are the over 65s, pregnant women, young kids and those with chronic conditions like diabetes, lung and heart disease. 

How to treat flu

To help you get better more quickly, the NHS advises you to: 

  • Rest and sleep 
  • Keep warm 
  • Take paracetamol or ibuprofen to lower your temperature and treat aches and pains 
  • Drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration (your pee should be light yellow or clear)

Published at Fri, 05 Jan 2018 09:36:00 +0000

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