Cruise secrets: Why the Drake Passage is the most dangerous sea in the WORLD

Cruise secrets: Why the Drake Passage is the most dangerous sea in the WORLD

Cruise ships can withstand extreme forces when out at sea, as they battle everything from thunderstorms to huge waves caused by hurricanes.



There is one place that is known for being one of the most dangerous seas in the world.

Called the Drake Passage, it is located between Cape Horn in South America and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica.

Also known as Sea of Hoces, the Drake Passage is named after Sir Francis Drake, a sea captain who travelled the world in the 16th century.

The 1000km (600m) wide passage is known as the gateway to Antarctica, but also one of the most treacherous and unpredictable seas.

It is caused by the mixture of cold and warm sea layers which mix, which creates huge currents and swells.

With the sea also not encountering any land masses to slow it down, this causes high speeds out at sea.

Adding in strong winds through the passage as well as brutal storms, it makes the ships that cruise through it battle all elements.

Cruise ships can withstand extreme forces when out at sea, as they battle everything from thunderstorms to huge waves caused by hurricanes.

There is one place that is known for being one of the most dangerous seas in the world.

Called the Drake Passage, it is located between Cape Horn in South America and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica.

Also known as Sea of Hoces, the Drake Passage is named after Sir Francis Drake, a sea captain who travelled the world in the 16th century.

Videos showing cruise ships battling the strong waves are common, with many being beaten by the huge swells.

One cruise liner is seen dramatically rising and falling as it is overpowered by the waves.

Another cruise ship even had to be rescued after falling into difficulty during the Drake Passage journey.

A large wave broke a piece of railing that smashes the bridge window, flooding the electrical panels.

Published at Sat, 11 Nov 2017 04:01:00 +0000

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